Other ticks

Figure 1. The scrub tick, Ixodes australiensis. Image courtesy of John Cooke CC BY-NC.
Figure 1. The scrub tick, Ixodes australiensis. Image courtesy of John Cooke CC BY-NC.

Scrub tick

(Ixodes australiensis)

The scrub tick (Ixodes australiensis) is regularly found on cattle in Western Australia and it is also known from eastern Victoria. Scrub tick has a 3-host life cycle. The preferred host for the scrub tick is Australian wildlife including the Western Grey Kangaroo, Bettong, Quokka and Potoroo. Scrub tick can readily tolerate hot environmental conditions. Nymph numbers rise in spring and adult numbers peak over spring and summer. Scrub tick has not been seen in large numbers on cattle, they prefer the native species listed above. Small numbers of scrub ticks found on cattle will be incidental and do not require treatment in their own right.
 

Figure 2. Geographic distribution of paralysis ticks in Australia. Image courtesy of Virbac.
Figure 2. Geographic distribution of paralysis ticks in Australia. Image courtesy of Virbac.

Southern paralysis tick

(Ixodes cornuatus)

Little is known of the 3-host life cycle, or seasonality of the southern paralysis tick, however, it is likely to be similar to that of its close relative the northern paralysis tick. Despite the fact it is the most common tick that affects livestock in Tasmania, virtually nothing is known about the preferred habitat or biology of this tick. Tick paralysis in dogs, cats, and sheep may be caused by the southern paralysis tick but its toxin has not been investigated in detail.


 

Figure 3. Underside of female brown dog tick laying eggs. Image courtesy of Constantin Constantinoiu.
Figure 3. Underside of female brown dog tick laying eggs. Image courtesy of Constantin Constantinoiu.

Brown dog tick

(Rhipicephalus sanguineus)

The brown dog tick is found primarily on domestic dogs, but this tick is occasionally found on cattle too. It is a 3-host tick. The life cycle can be completed in 10 weeks under ideal conditions with more than one life cycle per year possible. Although this tick can survive in open environments, it is highly adapted to living in dog kennels and in the homes of humans. The brown dog tick is a parasite of dogs in the tropics and sub-tropics although it is occasionally found as far as south as Sydney and Melbourne. If found on cattle, brown dog ticks will be in small numbers and incidental. Cattle will not require treatment.

 

The tick identification page describes how to distinguish brown dog tick from bush, paralysis and cattle ticks.
 

Wallaby tick

(Haemaphysalis bancrofti)

The wallaby tick is a small 3-host tick that is found primarily on wallabies and kangaroos but can also be found on cattle. Little is known about the distribution of the wallaby tick. Most records are from the east coast and Victoria. Larvae, nymphs and adults are present all year round suggesting more than one life cycle per year is possible. The wallaby tick can vector of the Theileria parasite.

Figure 4. The wallaby tick, Haemaphysalis-bancrofti-seen from above (left) and below (right). Image courtesy of L. Knott, School Vet Science, The University of Queensland
Figure 4. The wallaby tick, Haemaphysalis-bancrofti-seen from above (left) and below (right). Image courtesy of L. Knott, School Vet Science, The University of Queensland

Bandicoot tick

(Haemaphysalis humerosa)

The bandicoot tick is a 3-host tick of bandicoots that can also be found on cattle. The bandicoot tick is found in Western Australia, the Northern Territory, Queensland and New South Wales. The bandicoot tick can vector of the Theileria parasite.

Figure 5. The bandicoot tick, Haemaphysalis-humerosa seen from above (left) and below (right). Image courtesy of L. Knott, School Vet Science, The University of Queensland
Figure 5. The bandicoot tick, Haemaphysalis-humerosa seen from above (left) and below (right). Image courtesy of L. Knott, School Vet Science, The University of Queensland