Amitraz

What does it treat?

Cattle tick Paralysis tick Bush tick

Note: Very toxic to aquatic life with long lasting effects

How can it be administered?

A variety of application methods for administering pesticide products to cattle are in use.

Spray on Dip

  • Treat all animals in a mob to ensure effective control.

Resistance

Reported in: Cattle tick

What is resistance?

Figure 1. History of cattle tick resistance to amitraz (Ulam) in Queensland. Image courtesy of Queensland Department of Agriculture and Fisheries.
Figure 1. History of cattle tick resistance to amitraz (Ulam) in Queensland. Image courtesy of Queensland Department of Agriculture and Fisheries.

Safety

Everyone working in the rural industry has a ‘duty of care’; a legal obligation to provide a safe workplace for everyone on the property.

  • Amitraz may be harmful if swallowed, could cause lung damage if inhaled and may cause short term eye irritation.

Withholding   

Withholding periods are mandatory with all registered veterinary products used to treat animals for internal and external parasites.    

  • Always check the product label before use for specific withholding periods (WHP) and export slaughter interval (ESI) periods. Current ESI periods can be confirmed on the APVMA website.

Types of amitraz

A guide to the pests that amitraz affects are in Table 1. See the Products Search Guides for LiceBoss, WormBoss, TickBoss and FlyBoss for the appropriate formulation and application method for your target pest.

Table 1. Amitraz active and the targeted parasites for which formulations are registered for.

Chemical Pests targeted (may vary with formulation)
Worms Flies   Ticks   Lice Mites
Cattle tick Paralysis tick Bush tick
Amitraz      

 

What is it?

Amitraz is a chemical of the formamidine group developed in the early 1970’s as a broad spectrum insecticide and acaricide against ectoparasites such as ticks and mites.

Amitraz is an acaricide widely used in the control of organophosphate and synthetic pyrethroid resistant cattle ticks.

How does it work?

Acts as an agonist on octopamine receptors causing a range of behavioural changes including detachment and paralysis.